Tag Archives: copyright

Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Online Video

online video
The Center for Social Media has recently released a suggested code of best practice in fair use for online video.

More and more, video creation and sharing depend on the ability to use and circulate existing copyrighted work. Until now, that fact has been almost irrelevant in business and law, because broad distribution of nonprofessional video was relatively rare. Often people circulated their work within a small group of family and friends. But digital platforms make work far more public than it has ever been, and cultural habits and business models are developing. As practices spread and financial stakes are raised, the legal status of inserting copyrighted work into new work will become important for everyone.

It is important for video makers, online service providers, and content providers to understand the legal rights of makers of new culture, as policies and practices evolve. Only then will efforts to fight copyright “piracy” in the online environment be able to make necessary space for lawful, value-added uses.

Mashups, remixes, subs, and online parodies are new and refreshing online phenomena, but they partake of an ancient tradition: the recycling of old culture to make new. In spite of our romantic cliches about the anguished lone creator, the entire history of cultural production from Aeschylus through Shakespeare to Clueless has shown that all creators stand, as Isaac Newton (and so many others) put it, “on the shoulders of giants.”

TV is for old people, Conservatives want to make internet illegal

Variety is reporting on a study that concludes that the average TV viewer age is now 50. Old people watch TV, young people interact on the internet I guess.

In Canada, the Conservative federal government is “updating” the copyright laws and part of their insane plan is basically to make anyone under 50 a criminal. Here’s a summary of the backwards bill.

-There is a $500 statutory damage minimum for possession of a single file freed from crippling DRM. With some audiobooks each CD has 99 tracks. That’s $49,500 for one CD. WTF!?
-Any circumvention of DRM, even on files you’ve owned for decades, files you’ve purchased, been given as a gift, or inherited, will be deemed a violation and subject you to a $500 statutory damage minimum (per file). WTF!?
-It will be illegal to transfer DRM’d files to your own iPod or portable media player (you can’t strip-out the forced ads out of DVD that you own either). WTF!?

Here’s a Q&A session in parliament:

Wake-up Canada: Here Comes Copyright Legislation!

Goodbye Iphone

Facebook users delayed the bill before and on Thursday morning it is time for protests to grow even louder. Minister of Industry Jim Prentice and the Minister of Canadian Heritage Josée Verner want to lock up all data and destroy the very soul of the internet – sharing and collaboration. They obviously need to read Free! Why $0.00 Is the Future of Business and go back to their other oppressive activities:

The government is ready to introduce controversial new copyright legislation that experts believe will introduce harsh new restrictions on downloading, copying songs to CDs and music players, unlocking cellphones and time-shifting of television shows.

Minister of Industry Jim Prentice and the Minister of Canadian Heritage Josée Verner will unveil the bill to amend the Copyright Act on Thursday at 10:45 a.m. ET with brief statements, followed by a question-and-answer session with the media.